typing is not activism….

environ mentalism, fresh articles, interviews & checkitouts from Sydney.

Forest Industry of Tasmania – Asked & Answered.

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Reprinting this from here because it is a shittily arranged site and more chance that all you deep green commie lefties will look at this if you don’t have to click through to a clearfell lobbying www. And because I’ve… (answered it). Thanks David Obendorf for pointing out this piece of poop.

The Editor – Mercury, Examiner, Advocate 28/08/07

by Julian Amos as Chairman of Forest Industries Association of Tasmanistan

The arguments of those opposed to the pulp mill border on the surreal (because they are filthy dirty hippies who smoke mushrooms and collect Dali posters). Let us put some facts on the table (whoa big fella, let’s not get carried away).

The amount of dioxin being released from the mill each year is minute. It will, in
volume, be less than one grain of rice (rice that can destroy reproductive systems at concentrations of less than a grain of sand – not good for marine reproduction at all). Most of these substances will be discharged in the effluent not to the air. (thank god – i like pigeons and John Gay but i fucking can’t stand seals)

The level of dioxins and furans from the proposed mill is miniscule (0.111 grams) compared with the output of these substances from existing wood heaters (0.883 grams or over 96%) in the greater Launceston area (me think you is confused – particulate matter and dioxins are different. particulates are small solid pieces of air pollution that get stuck in lung tissue, dioxins are persistent pollutants that alter genetic functions at incredibly low concentrations). Wood heaters seriously affect the overall air quality in the Tamar and it is wood heaters and not the pulp mill that is the real issue to be addressed. (goddamn wood heaters! why should people be allowed to stay warm in their homes while Gunns lose millions of dollars a day. Shame Launceston, shame!)

The effluent from the mill, including the “grain of rice”, (which is actually one of the most lethal persistent poisons known to humanity, as opposed to actual rice which is an edible grain) will be dispersed via a 3km outlet pipe into Bass Strait, in an area where there is no commercial scallop fishery (so if nobody’s making money off it, we really should bugger it – it’s what the market would want). The Maryvale mill in Victoria has been discharging its effluent into Bass Strait for years, with no adverse effect on the marine environment or any fishery. (may be because they claim to have eliminated emissions of 2378TCDD dioxins. no reported effect from a company with 70 years in pulp industry that as of 10 years ago was still 90% native forest dependent. Nice example.)

The mill will be situated in an area where there are vineyards. In the premium grape growing districts of Provence and Bordeaux, in France, vineyards inhabit the same territory as pulp mills, with no loss of reputation, tourism attraction, or wine quality. (yes, good talking point – in Bordeaux, an inexperienced company that nobody trusts has run a million tonne pulp mill for years. There has never been an accident and people travel there every year for fresh wine, clean air, and France’s breathtaking biodiversity.)

Those who argue for a site move to Hampshire from the Tamar for environmental reasons are being less than honest (that would bother you?). First, there is no proposal to do so, and anyway, why is that site any more “environmentally appropriate”. (no air shed issues, in the middle of Gunns’ plantations, not disrupting existing industries, would have to be properly assessed in the way that Tamar wasn’t)
Industrial plant in Tasmania operates under license conditions. If those conditions are breached, the plant is shut down. The pulp mill will operate under license conditions, and will be treated no differently to any other industrial plant. (as long as Gunns turn themselves in every time they fuck up. That’s another job created right there.)
Those who argue that the mill will destroy Tasmania’ forests conveniently ignore the fact that no additional timber will be cut to feed the mill – woodchips that are presently exported as woodchips will be the feedstock for the mill. (this is false, not only will the mill continue to consume native forests while plantation chips are exported, but the woodchips that are presently exported will most likely have been used overseas by the time the mill can be built.)

And finally (i doubt it), those complaining of the fast-track process (and corruption of due process, and incompetence, and fat belly laughter) by the State Government should reflect on the fact that it was the RPDC process that was flawed, because of the lack of a timeline. (no, we’ve all been over this. The RPDC process was flawed because nobody submitted a competent or complete or accurate Integrated Impact Statement for them to work with, despite numerous invitations and requests for someone to submit said item.) To say that the public has been denied the opportunity for input is wrong. The public had input into the RPDC process and that input has been included under the present arrangements, both State and Federal. (‘inclusion’ is not the same as consideration. And reluctant inclusion without proper consultation, compared with encouraging a corporation to draft and edit legislation before elected unrepresentatives even get a look in?)

The public needs to have the full facts and not simply the biased presentations from the anti-mill lobby. (Yes, the public needs to have the full facts,so give em the facts, fool! Oh, that’s right. Facts are commercial in confidence aren’t they?)

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Written by typingisnotactivism

August 31, 2007 at 12:13 pm

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